Monthly Archives: April 2016

Contacts Lenses Tips For Your Health

1. Is the contact lens inside out ?

A question many newbie wearers have is: “How can I tell if my contact lens is inside-out?”

The difference can be subtle, but before placing a contact lens on your eye, make sure it looks like half a ball, not a soup bowl with a rim.

The trick is to place the lens on your finger so that a cup is formed. Then hold the lens up directly in front of your eyes so you’re looking at the side of the cup.

If the lens forms a “U” with the top edges flared out, it’s inside out. If it forms just a “U,” it’s in the correct position.

If you’re wearing lenses with a handling tint, another way is to place the lens on your fingertip and then look down at it. The edge of a tinted lens should look very blue (or green, depending on the tint); that won’t be the case if the lens is inverted.

Some contact lenses also have a laser marking, such as the brand name, on the edge to help you. If you can read it properly, the lens is not inside out.

Don’t worry if you place a contact lens in your eye inside out. The lens will feel uncomfortable, but it can’t do any damage.

2.Apply your contact lense

Make sure you wash your hands thoroughly before applying your contact lenses, but avoid scented or oily soaps that might adhere to the lens surface. Especially avoid using products containing lanolin and moisturizing lotions.

Some eye doctors say to always apply the first contact lens in the same eye, so you’ll avoid the possibility of mixing up lenses for the right eye and left eye.

Other basic guidelines for contact lens application include:

  • Gently shake your lens case containing the storage solution, to loosen the contact lens should it be stuck. (Don’t try pulling at the lens with your finger, or you might damage it.)
  • Slide the lens out of its case and into the palm of your hand. Rinse thoroughly with the appropriate contact lens solution.
  • Place the contact lens on the tip of your index or middle finger, which should be dry or mostly dry.
  • With the fingers and thumb of your other hand, simultaneously pull up on your upper eyelid and down on your lower eyelid.
  • Position the lens on your eye while looking upward or forward, whichever you find to be easier. You also can apply the contact lens by placing it on the white of the eye closest to your ear.
  • Gently close your eye, roll your eyes in a complete circle to help the lens settle, and then blink.
  • Look closely in the mirror to make sure the lens is centered on your eye. If it is, the lens should be comfortable and your vision should be clear.

3. Removing your contact lenses

Always wash your hands before removing contact lenses. If you are standing in front of a sink, use a clean paper towel to cover the drain where the contact lens might accidentally fall.

CONTACT LENS SAFETY TIPS

  • DO make sure contact lenses and lens storage cases are cleaned and disinfected regularly, according to your eye doctor’s instructions.
  • DON’T place contact lenses in your mouth or use your saliva to wet them.
  • DO replace contact lenses regularly, according to your eye doctor’s directions.
  • DON’T “top off” old solution in your contact lens case. Instead, discard old solution and replace it with fresh solution.
  • DO always rub contact lenses when you clean them, even if using a “no-rub” solution.

Read “Caring For Soft Contact Lenses” for more advice on keeping your lenses safe and hygienic.

To remove soft contact lenses, look upward or sideways while you pull down on your lower eyelid. With a finger, gently maneuver the lens onto the white of your eye. There, you can very gently pinch the lens together with your index finger and thumb and lift it off the eye.

Until you master contact lens removal, you might want to keep your fingernails short to avoid accidentally scratching and damaging your eye.

Gas permeable contact lenses can be removed by holding out the palm of your hand, bending over, and then opening your eye wide. With one finger of your other hand, pull the skin between your upper and lower eyelid (just outside the lateral aspect of your eye) outward toward your ear with your eye wide open. Then blink. The contact lens should pop right out and into your open palm.

Devices for removing contact lenses, called “plungers,” also are available from your eye doctor, and can be used to touch and directly remove a lens from your eye. Just make sure you touch only the lens and not your eye’s surface with these devices.

While you might hear a myth or two about someone “losing” a contact lens in the back of the eye, this is actually impossible because of a membrane that connects your eye to the back of your eyelid.

4. Contact lense and uv light

Researchers have linked ultraviolet (UV) light to the formation of cataracts. Exposure to excessive UV light also may result in a condition called photokeratitis.

Always put your contact lenses on beforeapplying eye shadow, mascara and eyeliner.

That’s why some contact lenses now contain a UV-blocking agent. You can’t tell if a contact lens has a UV blocker just by looking at it — the blocking agent is clear, so as not to disturb vision. The contact lens packaging will specify if the product has a UV blocker, or you can ask your eye doctor.

Very important: UV-blocking contacts are not meant to replace sunglasses. A contact lens covers only your cornea, not your entire eye.

However, UV-blocking contact lenses do help protect the portion of the white of your eye that is covered from formation of growths such as pingueculae and pterygia.

Sunglasses with UV protection can cover more of your eye and the parts of your face that surround the eye, depending on the size of the sunglass lens. That’s why contacts with UV blockers are designed to complement sunglass use as an added protection.

5. Eye make up and contact lenses

Getting makeup in your eye is annoying. But it’s even worse with contacts, because it can stick to the lenses instead of flushing right out. Follow these tips to keep your eyes looking and feeling good:

  1. Put your contact lenses on before applying makeup. And always wash your hands thoroughly before touching your contacts, so you won’t transfer any oils, creams or lotions to the lenses.
  2. Use only non-allergenic makeup. Almay and Clinique have eye-friendly products, but there are other good brands as well.
  3. Cream eye shadow is less likely to get in your eye than powder. But creams can irritate your eyes more if they do make it into your eyes. Choose water-based rather than oil-based creams.
  4. If you prefer powder, keep your eyes closed during application. Then, brush off any excess powder before opening your eyes.
  5. Never apply eyeliner between your lashes and your eye. Apply eyeliner only on the portion of your lashes that is well away from your eye.
  6. To remove eye makeup, wash and dry your hands. Then remove your contacts, being careful not to bump them into any makeup. Finally, use your eye makeup remover.
  7. Replace your eye makeup frequently — at least every three months. Don’t use old eye makeup, because over time bacteria will get into the product and then into your eyes, where it can cause an infection. One way to tell if your makeup is too old is if it smells funny. Also, don’t share your eye makeup with others.

Are you changing your contact lens case often? A dirty case can lead to fungal eye infections, even if you’re diligent about cleaning your contacts.

 

In order to help maximum lens wearing comfort, consider these important tips for successful lens wear and care.

These tips will help guide you, but always follow the advice of your eye care professional.

Always attention :

  1. Always wash your hands with a mild soap and dry them with a lint-free towel before touching your lenses.
  2. Always clean, rinse, and disinfect your lenses each time you remove them. Follow your eye care professional’s instructions.
  3. Always handle the same lens first to avoid confusing the right and left lenses
  4. Always keep all solution bottles closed when not in use.
  5. Always clean your lens case daily and let air dry. Replace your lens case every three months.
  6. Always use solution before expiration date marked on bottle, or discard.
  7. Always remove contacts before you go swimming.
  8. Always keep ReNu MultiPlus Lubricating and Rewetting Drops with you at all times.
  9. Always carry your contact lens case along with a bottle of multi-purpose solution to have a safe place to store your lenses.
  10. Always schedule regular appointments with your eye care professional as he/she recommends.

Never forget about :

  • Never allow soaps, cosmetics, or other substances to come into contact with your lenses.
  • Never touch the tip of a lens care solution bottle to any surface, including your finger or the contact lens.
  • Never re-use any lens care solution.
  • Never use eye drops or solutions not intended for use with contact lenses.
  • Never wear your contact lenses in the presence of harmful or irritating vapors or fumes.
  • Never wear lenses for more than the prescribed time.
  • Never swap contact lenses with anyone.
  • Never apply hairspray after putting your contact lenses on.

High Heels Shoes Tips For Comfortable and Great

1. Shave down your heel

If you’re willing to sacrifice a little height for the ability to walk through a room with ease, consider shaving down the heel. For around $15, a shoe repair shop like Steve Express Shoe Repair in New York City can simply cut off a portion of the spike. According to Steve, the owner, the maximum that’s usually removed is “around an inch.” Any more and you would feel the difference in the shoe’s arched construction.

2. Use gel insoles

Gel insoles solve a lot of heel-wearing problems. For one thing, they can prevent toes from scrunching and thereby prevent blisters. Dr. Scholl’s sellshigh heel insoles with arch shaping to keep pressure off your foot. If your toes are constantly sliding forward in your shoes, there’s even a cushion designed to hold the ball of your foot in place. The gel inserts stick to your shoe insoles well but are also easy to swap among your shoes. The product’s website advises to replace them every six months, or when they start to tear.

3. Change the way that you walk

You don’t have to be a Next Top Model fan to know that when it comes to walking in heels, Tyra actually does know what she’s talking about. Perhaps that’s why she created this video. A few rules from Tyra: Realize you’re not on a casual stroll in sneakers and that posture is essential to adding flow to your stride. The correct way to walk in heels involves keeping your head and spine straight, as if you’re being pulled up by a string. As you walk, use your hips to shift and lift your legs to the center with each step you take. Your paces should look more like a light bounce than like you’re saving yourself from a fall. Since wearing your heels means your feet no longer form a 90 degree angle with your ankles, changing your gait will help you readjust your body’s center of gravity and find balance. You still won’t feel like you’re walking on clouds, but this method will at least make heels feel more bearable.

4.Take regular breaks

On its website, Leather Spa, a popular shoe repair shop in the heart of Manhattan, recommends not wearing heels more than two days in a row, with at least a day’s break in between. If you want to keep walking four inches off the ground, you’ve got to give your feet time to recover in between.

5. Get heels with ties

Have you ever noticed how frustrating it is to deal with your feet slipping out of your heels the minute they leave the ground? Even worse, loose shoes often make you drag your feet in an attempt to prevent them from falling out. Heels with straps, ties, or buckles over the ankle or feet offer a solution. Go for adjustable straps to accommodate swelling.

6. Use Moleskin

Also known as “second skin,” moleskin is not actually animal hide (fortunately) but soft cotton flannel with adhesive backing. Sold in sheets and available in most drug stores and online, you can cut and customize the shape of moleskin to cover any trouble spots you have on your feet. It molds to the shape of your feet better than a bandage, and unlike a bandage, it won’t hang off your Achilles after half a day of walking.

7. Stretch out your shoes

Model Molly Sims recommends going half a size up when shopping for heels, and Franklin Polun, a Potomac, Md.-based podiatrist, advises going shoe shopping at the end of the day when your feet are swollen from activity. A little wiggle room can mean much more comfort.

When it comes to the too-tight heels you already own, you have a couple of options. You can either take them to a cobbler to have them stretched, or you can also invest in a shoe stretcher for heels (Footsmart sells them for $25 each), which also cuts down the time it take to break heels in when they’re brand new.

8. Pick a shape that affords optimal comfort

It’s amazing how much the shape of your shoe impacts the comfort. For instance, platforms (this kind, not the ones Elton John wore in the ’70s) cut down the distance your heels are elevated above the balls of your feet. That means they’re not as taxing on your arch, which is especially good when you’re towering on at least three inches. A rounder toe box is also worlds more comfortable and better for your feet, because it allows your toes to lay flat. However, pointy toes are doable as long as the point stretches out instead of stopping right where your toes would rest.

9. Sixe Matters

First and foremost, you want to make sure your heels (or any shoe, for that matter) are the proper size. If they’re too big, your foot will slide around awkwardly. Too small and your foot will feel cramped, which’ll make walking a pain — literally and figuratively. For the best fit, get your foot sized frequently. “Your foot size changes over the years, even as much as one full size, especially after having kids,” About.com’s podiatry expert Dr. Catherine Moyer told StyleCaster. “Have your feet sized once a year, and do it if you’ve never had it done. . . . A lot of people think they’re a wide or vise versa, and they’re not, so definitely do that before you shop.”

10. Pace Yourself

If you’ve never baked before, you wouldn’t start out by baking a five-tier fondant-covered cake from scratch. No, you’d start with a box of Betty Crocker. The same applies when you’re trying out heels. “If you’ve never walked in high heels before, don’t start out learning with 5-inch stilettos — that’s a recipe for pain and maybe even injury,” College Fashion editor Zephyr Basine writes. “Try something smaller, like a 2-inch heel or wedge to get used to the feeling. You can always work your way up to your most killer heels.”

11. Be Conscious of the Rest of Your Body

Victor Chu, a New York-based footwear designer who teaches a class about how to walk in high heels, boiled down the formula for Oprah.com: “Engage your abs — this gives you poise and control. Walk heel to toe, which transfers impact to the leg instead of the ball of the foot. And relax your hips and knees so you’ll be fluid and graceful.” It’s kind of like doing that thing where you pat your head and rub your stomach at the same time. It seems impossible at first but then, eventually, you get into a rhythm.